Designing Parking for Your New Timber Frame Home

After you finalize your bathroom design, check out our guides to designing working, living, sleeping, bath, kitchen and storage zones.

The final activity zone in the design process is the garage and storage areas. These areas have a basic set of space rules.

Starting with the driveway, the layout of your lot will dictate your driveway design. Ensure that you will have enough room for your automobiles, as well as visitors and maneuvering during all four seasons. If winter historically brings heavy snowfall, consider a south-facing driveway or how you will plow it (and where the resulting snow piles will go).

Take stock of all your toys. Will you need extra space for boats, campers, UTVs, or any other vehicles you are likely to add in the years to come? Yes? Then it’s time to plan for them.

Sizing the Garage

Decisions on the size of the garage will also need to be made, including whether you want a two, three, or four vehicle-sized garage. Will it be attached to the home or as a separate building? Will you need a breezeway between the garage and your home? Some buyers opt to build a garage for their automobiles and a second garage or barn for their RV and boats. Homes with extra garage space appreciate at a greater rate than homes with two-car garages. Extra investment now could yield larger returns.

Today’s garages can be multi-use structures, fully insulated and heated, so they can serve as a hobby space and extension of the home. This can include a laundry room, water heater, furnace, freezer, or equipment room. Some buyers opt to install rooms over the garage, including home theaters or game rooms.

Decks & Porches

Don’t underestimate the importance of decks and porches for your new home, as they help bring the outdoors inside and serve as transition spaces. Having a covered area outside is a great way to enjoy different weather while still being comfortable. Others want outdoor kitchens that rival what is inside. Some buyers envision sleeping porches that are screened in and enable the owners to fully enjoy the spring and summer months as if they are camping, but with all the comforts of home. Utilizing outdoor spaces can also make a smaller home live larger.

Even if you cannot afford it now, you can plan to add them later when your budget allows.

Discover Other Activity Zone Design Strategies

We know there’s a lot to think about when designing your home and the Woodhouse design team brings the experience of over 1,000 successful design projects to helping you do it right. While it is tempting to jump right into figuring out a floor plan, it is best to spend time on form and function first in relationship to your building site. Each area of a home serves a certain function, which will generally dictate eventual form. Check out our guides to designing other activity zones, including working, living, bath, sleeping, kitchen and storage zones.

“We know there’s a lot to think about when designing your home and the Woodhouse design team brings the experience of over 1,000 successful design projects to helping you do it right.”